Kane bags three as Spurs cruise home

The score was 3-0. Harry Kane had two goals already when he found Dele Alli on the edge of the area. Alli, one of the most exciting players unearthed in England for years, received the ball and stopped, leaving the defenders who now crowded around him in limbo. From a standing start he lifted it over all of them, finding Kane with pinpoint accuracy. All Kane had to do was get a boot on it and allow it to trickle in. Ben Foster, in the West Brom goal, half-stuck out a leg to stop it. He had performed admirably, but now he had given up.

It would be hard to find anyone who could blame him. West Brom had started the match against Tottenham Hotspur hopeful of a good result, but in the end they were extremely lucky that they only lost 4-0. From the word go, Spurs played as if there was no opposition, dominating possession and cutting through West Brom’s stacked defence with almost contemptuous ease. Kane nearly scored in the first five minutes, getting on the end of a brilliant cross from Danny Rose and almost directing it into the bottom corner.

A few minutes later they were ahead, with Kane finishing after a brilliant pass from Christian Eriksen. He controlled it at close quarters before slotting it into the top corner, past a sliding Jonas Olsson and a diving Foster. Spurs had the lead, and they needed to stay in control.

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Collision: Jonas Olsson (right) attempts to block Kyle Walker’s attempt at a volley.

Things only got worse for West Brom after Spurs opened the scoring. The hosts were brimming with confidence, and they continued to hold the ball and sustain the pressure. Salomon Rondon, West Brom’s sole striker, was so isolated he may as well have celebrated every time he actually touched the ball. Worse still, he probably had the time. Meanwhile, Kane was in everything as Spurs forced a string of corners. Once he was tripped by Olsson as the long-haired Swede looked to hold him back at a corner. Referee Anthony Taylor called nothing. Kane had a chance when Victor Wanyama put a dangerous ball into the box, but Foster managed to deny him.

That the second goal was adjudged to be an own goal should take nothing away from Spurs. It started with Danny Rose, who beat a couple on the break before giving it to Eriksen. Both continued moving forward, and after Kyle Walker put in an excellent pass both Rose and Eriksen touched the ball before Eriksen’s shot was deflected past Foster by McAuley, the Northern Irishman who could not take a trick. Later on in the piece, he was clearly tripped by Walker, and when he complained to the assistant he was booked for dissent. It was that kind of day.

Kane, Alli and Eriksen, however, could do no wrong. Shortly after Spurs doubled their lead came the biggest disappointment of the match, when Alli had a goal disallowed for offside. Eriksen lifted it over the top, and Alli’s touch was sublime as he diverted it past Foster with the side of his boot. Unfortunately, it didn’t count for anything, but it still summed up the first half-hour perfectly.

Kane would have a couple more chances in the first half, but he was still yet to add to his first goal as the sides went to the break, West Brom down 2-0 and completely and utterly beaten. Tony Pulis made some changes at half-time, and they came out much improved, but things changed very little. Even with a bit more possession, their best chance of the game came when Darren Fletcher was presented with an open goal. An open goal from just inside halfway, that is.

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Too easy: Harry Kane (front) scores his third goal as Craig Dawson desperately tries to stop him.

Soon Spurs had worked out the change in shape, and they were back to their old ways. Alli was denied a penalty when he was pushed by Craig Dawson, and suddenly the chances were coming again. One Eriksen corner drew shots from Kane, Toby Alderweireld and Jan Vertonghen, and forced two great saves from Foster. Then Kane turned Olsson after an incredible display of skill from Alli, and Foster was forced into another brilliant stop.

Every time Spurs had the ball they looked as if they would score, such was their assurance in how they went about their business. Kane was fouled by Olsson as he looked to break through, a foul which may have drawn a red card if it had occurred closer to goal. Wanyama forced a great save from Foster, before Kane slotted his second.

Once again, it was Alli who started it, playing a long ball down the right wing which Walker pursued with vigour. McAuley got there first but was hurried off the ball, allowing Walker to put the ball in for Kane. Foster had inexplicably come off his line, and he was nowhere near it. Finally, the result was beyond all doubt.

Kane added his third shortly after, and received a much-deserved ovation as he left the game in the ninetieth minute, replaced by Son Heung-min. For Spurs, they put in a performance worthy of the title contenders that they are, and seem to be finding their feet as the end of the season creeps upon us.

London – White Hart Lane
Tottenham Hotspur 4 (Kane 12, 77, 82, McAuley 26 og)
West Bromwich Albion 0
Referee: Anthony Taylor

Tottenham Hotspur (3-4-2-1): Lloris – Dier, Alderweireld, Vertonghen (Davies 64); Walker, Wanyama, Dembele (Winks 83), Rose; Eriksen, Alli; Kane (Son 90).
West Bromwich Albion (4-2-3-1): Foster – Dawson, McAuley, Olsson, Brunt (McClean 54); Fletcher, Yacob; Chadli (Robson-Kanu 62), Morrison, Phillips (Field 90); Rondon.

Top 5
1. Harry Kane (Tottenham Hotspur)
Kane was everywhere from start to finish, bagging a hat-trick and allowing Spurs to ram home their early dominance with his excellent finishing. He combined brilliantly with Eriksen and Alli, and he fully deserved the standing ovation he received when leaving the field.
2. Christian Eriksen (Tottenham Hotspur)
Eriksen was in top form throughout, directing everything and creating huge problems for West Brom with his skill and vision. He was unlucky not to be credited with Tottenham’s second goal, and he will be looking to keep up his excellent form in weeks to come.
3. Dele Alli (Tottenham Hotspur)
Alli was on top of his game, showing incredible skill and setting up Kane’s third goal with a brilliant lofted pass. He had a beautiful finish disallowed for offside, and his combination with Kane and Eriksen was a key part of Tottenham’s success.
4. Kyle Walker (Tottenham Hotspur)
Walker was excellent as a right wing-back, taking Matt Phillips out of the game and pressing forward to open up the midfield for Spurs. He assisted the third goal with an excellent cross, and his energy in both attack and defence was outstanding.
5. Ben Foster (West Bromwich Albion)
Foster was the main reason West Brom only lost 4-0, making a string of brilliant saves and keeping the lead at 2-0 for most of the match. He conceded a couple of goals at the end, but in a game where the presence of most of his teammates was non-existent he can hold his head high.

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Spurs push hard but can’t find a way

Georges-Kevin N’Koudou played a desperate cross into the box. It was the 96th minute, the scores were level and Tottenham Hotspur had one last roll of the dice left. The cross was a failure, but the rebound fell to left back Danny Rose, who was in a fairly strong position. He controlled the ball, took the shot, and could only watch as it hit the side of the goal. Bobby Madley blew his whistle, and it was all over, marking another disappointing draw for Spurs and adding to their ever-increasing list of missed opportunities.

Their opponents were Leicester City, the reigning champions who have not done a thing right this year. They have been crushed by Manchester United, Liverpool and Chelsea, with no hint of the defensive steel which saw them capture the Premier League title against all odds. It was a game that Tottenham, yet to lose a Premier League match this season, were widely expected to win.

The game started slowly, but eventually Spurs began to take the upper hand. Slowly but surely the chances came, and Mauricio Pochettino’s side were soon well on top, almost without anyone realising. Leicester came close when Riyad Mahrez, one of the most dangerous players in the Premier League and a nightmare for opposing defenders, put the ball in for Shinji Okazaki. The resultant header was just over the bar.

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Under pressure: Son Heung-min (left) controls the ball with Christian Fuchs in pursuit.

Aside from that, Spurs were looking in control but struggling to find their touch in front of goal. New signing Vincent Janssen, the Dutchman touted as the next big thing after a record-breaking season with AZ Alkmaar, was part of the problem. He was described as skilful and strong. Instead, on this day he was an obstacle to his own team’s success, bumbling around as Son Heung-min, Christian Eriksen and Dele Alli worked tirelessly to feed him. He was the lone elephant amongst a herd of gazelles.

Spurs started to find some more openings as the game went on, with Alli hitting the bar before Janssen gave his side the lead from the spot. Eriksen’s free kick was flicked on by Eric Dier to the big Dutchman, who fought against Robert Huth and Danny Drinkwater to control it. Huth was the culprit, first wrapping an arm around Janssen before throwing him to the ground. Madley didn’t have much of a choice but to award a penalty, and Janssen converted the kick with ease.

Leicester needed someone to step up, and that man was Jamie Vardy. In the lead up to this match Vardy had been a shadow of the player he was as Leicester won the Premier League, rarely contributing to the scoresheet and not really getting involved. In the first half, he had barely touched the ball, let alone done anything with it. Now, however, he stepped up, turning the game on its head with an excellent second half performance.

He started by rectifying the deficit. Victor Wanyama was the culprit for Spurs, leaving all wondering what was going through his head as he headed the ball past centre backs Dier and Jan Vertonghen towards his own goal. Vardy pounced. He used his pace to find some space in behind Dier, and with surgical precision he threaded his pass straight into the path of Ahmed Musa, who simply could not miss. The Nigerian injured himself as he tumbled into the back of the net, but the damage was done.

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Unstoppable: Ahmed Musa (right) puts the ball past Hugo Lloris into the back of the net.

Suddenly, Leicester were back in the game. Vardy had found his touch, and whenever he could get the ball at his feet he looked very dangerous. Spurs, on the other hand, were panicked and rushed. Eriksen was the calm at the centre of the storm, forcing a strong save from Kasper Schmeichel and setting up a great opportunity for Son with a well-executed free kick. He was a cool head amidst the crisis, but even he was struggling to find an opening.

Janssen had a couple of golden opportunities to put his side back in front, but he missed the target by inches with both attempts. Meanwhile, at the other end, Leicester were starting to retain the ball. Vardy was finding the ball and picking out dangerous passes, and soon the hunter had become the hunted. Spurs were forced to keep their opponents at bay as Leicester attacked with a combination of crosses and long throw-ins, and for once it looked as if Spurs had no hope of taking victory.

They had some chances as space began to open up, and Vertonghen came agonisingly close when his header hit the bar, but it was over. The final whistle signified the end of another disappointment for Spurs, another game which they should have won but didn’t. They remain the only undefeated team in the league, but if they are to win it they need to improve. Fast.

London – White Hart Lane
Tottenham Hotspur 1 (Janssen 44 pen)
Leicester City 1 (Musa 48)
Referee: Bobby Madley
Tottenham Hotspur (4-2-3-1): Lloris – Walker, Dier, Vertonghen, Rose; Wanyama (Winks 87), Dembele; Eriksen, Alli (N’Koudou 83), Son; Janssen.
Leicester City (4-4-2): Schmeichel – Simpson, Morgan, Huth, Fuchs; Mahrez (Albrighton 72), Drinkwater, King, Musa (Schlupp 68); Okazaki (Ulloa 78), Vardy.

Top 5
1. Christian Eriksen (Tottenham Hotspur)
Eriksen was on top of his game, working his way into dangerous positions and creating plenty of issues for Leicester with his excellent delivery from set pieces. He was in control on the ball, and was a cut above the rest.
2. Jamie Vardy (Leicester City)
Vardy was almost non-existent in the first half, but his second half effort was enough to save the game for his team. He created a goal for Musa with his run in behind, and caused plenty of defensive problems for Spurs. He has been out of sorts lately, and he will take confidence from his second half performance.
3. Danny Rose (Tottenham Hotspur)
Rose was a key player in both attack and defence, pushing forward when necessary and finding plenty of good options when he received the ball. He was never beaten by Mahrez as the Algerian looked to weave past him on numerous occasions, and he tested his man with his willingness to push up the pitch.
4. Kasper Schmeichel (Leicester City)
Schmeichel denied Spurs on a number of occasions, and he was unlucky to concede the way he did. He was lucky at times but whenever he needed to make a save he did, showing excellent technique and rarely allowing his opponents a second bite of the cherry.
5. Kyle Walker (Tottenham Hotspur)
Walker used his pace and ability to get forward to great effect, creating plenty of chances with his dangerous balls from the right wing and often beating Musa for pace as he looked for an opening. Defensively, he was solid, and he was rarely caught out, even when Leicester broke away with pace.

Bournemouth show fight, but skilful Spurs come away with draw

A quick look at the result of the match between Bournemouth and Tottenham Hotspur may lead one to conclude that the match was cautious, even dull. Instead, it proved to be an intense and pulsating contest, featuring two enterprising teams playing aggressive, uncompromising football. There was very little time and space for the players on the ball, as both teams desperately looked to hound each other to suppress the other.

The quaintly named Dean Court was anything but as the match got underway. The lack of size in the stadium, one of the last remaining relics from Bournemouth’s time in lower league football, amplified the noise and the pressure. Bournemouth started the game with pace and purpose, and almost immediately had Spurs on the back foot.

The game had barely started when left back Charlie Daniels had a perfect opportunity to open the scoring for Bournemouth. Jack Wilshere’s corner was flicked on by Callum Wilson in the direction of Dan Gosling, whose ball travelled through Erik Lamela to find Daniels in a wonderful position. The chance was straightforward, but Hugo Lloris was there, the Tottenham goalkeeper miraculously deflecting the ball off the bar and out. The game went on.

Bournemouth continued to press forward as the game progressed, using the pace of Jordon Ibe and Wilson to unlock holes in the Tottenham defence. Spurs had no space on the ball, and most of their moves seemed to result in Lloris clearing the ball up field. Lamela hit the bar after Dele Alli nutmegged two opponents to open up space, and then committed a frustration foul mere seconds later. There were to be no more chances in that run of play.

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Physical: Jack Wilshere (left) challenges for the ball with Victor Wanyama.

Son Heung-min, red hot during Tottenham’s recent run of form, was completely out of the game. The Korean looked out of his league, and the delivery he received was poor to say the least. When he finally received the ball in the box, he fell over and hit a panicky pass to no-one in particular. It was intercepted.

Erik Lamela’s day was hit and miss, with very little hit. He rarely passed, and was lucky not to receive a second yellow card minutes before half time after he left his feet and fouled an opponent. His attempts to take on his opponents didn’t really work, and he lost the ball more than any of his teammates. Bournemouth were coming from every direction and every angle, hounding Spurs with every chance they had.

As the half neared the close, play became increasingly physical and referee Craig Pawson’s book started to fill up. A hold here, a bodycheck there, but the end result was the same. By the end of the half, five had been cautioned, the scene set for a tense second period.

Spurs came out after half time quickly, looking to stamp their authority on the game. They moved the ball well, pinning Bournemouth into their defensive half, but they kept breaking down with the final pass. Alli attracted two or three whenever he received the ball, and while Christian Eriksen was elusive as ever as he sauntered around in attack his skill was not enough. Son could not really get the ball at his feet, and he was soon substituted.

Bournemouth were not yet done, however, and they responded to Tottenham’s onslaught by regaining their counter-attacking ability. They put the pressure on, and as Spurs made use of the extra space it became an end to end affair. Attacks came close on both sides, but both defences were ready to do anything to keep the deadlock, throwing themselves around and making plenty of key challenges.

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Controversy: Players from both sides remonstrate after an incident between Moussa Sissoko (second from left) and Harry Arter (far right).

Then came the incident, one which set the fans off and created an incredible atmosphere. Harry Arter tackled Moussa Sissoko, who was desperate to quickly take the resultant throw-in. Sissoko sought out contact in an attempt to claim the ball, yet what looked like a relatively innocuous little bump turned out to be an elbow to the head, setting Arter off and bringing in a posse of Bournemouth players to remonstrate.

It was as clear a red card as one could imagine, but Sissoko stayed on the pitch despite the proximity of three officials, none of whom could quite see enough to force Pawson’s hand. Either way, the incident reinvigorated the crowd, who were on their feet and only stopped their cheering to boo Sissoko when he touched the ball.

The game was pulsating to the close, as Bournemouth fought hard to find their winner in injury time, putting plenty of pressure on Spurs and their defence. They held firm to keep the scores level, ensuring that an even game got the result that it deserved. It was scoreless, but it was anything but boring.

Bournemouth – Dean Court
Bournemouth 0
Tottenham Hotspur 0
Referee: Craig Pawson

Bournemouth (4-2-3-1): Boruc – Smith, Francis, Cook, Daniels; Gosling, Arter; King (Fraser 88), Wilshere, Ibe (Gradel 60); Wilson (Afobe 82).
Tottenham Hotspur (4-2-3-1): Lloris – Walker, Dier, Vertonghen, Rose; Wanyama, Dembele; Lamela, Alli (Sissoko 71), Eriksen; Son (Janssen 62).

Top 5
1. Kyle Walker (Tottenham Hotspur)
Walker was excellent defensively, but it was his attacking input that really stood out, pushing forward to create plenty of problems for Bournemouth. His pace and ability to get back after losing the ball was incredible, and it saved a number of goals along the way. An excellent effort.
2. Simon Francis (Bournemouth)
Francis was never really beaten on the day, winning every aerial duel and shutting down plenty of Tottenham’s attacks. His skill on the ball created some chances in attack when he pushed forward for set pieces, and he showed plenty of composure under pressure throughout.
3. Christian Eriksen (Tottenham Hotspur)
In a game where Spurs had almost no space whatsoever, Eriksen looked a cut above on the ball, untouchable while his teammates floundered in possession. He skipped out of the way of tackles and made incisive passes, and while he was unable to break through he played a very strong game.
4. Adam Smith (Bournemouth)
Smith was excellent throughout as an attacking right back, creating chances when he pressed forward and defending solidly all game. He was never really caught out, and he shut down Lamela with his ability to put pressure on and make effective tackles.
5. Jan Vertonghen (Tottenham Hotspur)
Vertonghen was a rock at the back for Spurs, making key tackle after key tackle and ensuring Bournemouth were kept at bay. He saved a goal late in the game with a perfect sliding tackle on Max Gradel, and was one of the main reasons the scores were level at the end.