Thunder don’t die wondering, but can’t keep their season alive

Sydney Thunder vs Melbourne Renegades
Melbourne Renegades 189-6 (Harris 64, Short 28, Sandhu 37-2) def Sydney Thunder 180 (Rohrer 48, Nair 45, Richardson 22-4, Pollard 19-2, Tremain 33-2) by 9 runs at Manuka Oval

The Sydney Thunder needed to win to stay in the competition. It was as simple as that. There was no need to worry about the mysterious permutations thrown up by net run rates and the like. There was only the Melbourne Renegades, who probably needed to win to make finals but quite possibly didn’t given the murky nature of top four qualification. Either way, it was a big match, and a chance for the Thunder to steal a finals berth against a weakened Renegades side. They couldn’t manage, delivering an inconsistent effort with the bat and ball, and compounding their woes with some dismal efforts in the field. They were lucky to get as close as they did to pulling off a remarkable heist.

The Thunder were put under pressure early thanks to Marcus Harris. It was Harris’ lucky night, and he capitalised with his best knock of the season. He was lucky to keep his place, only playing the match thanks to Brad Hodge’s late scratching. He was lucky to receive a series of half-volleys and full tosses from the usually accurate Gurinder Sandhu, allowing him to pierce the off-side field twice in the first over. He was lucky when he nicked a swinging length delivery from the same bowler, only for the tough chance to rebound off the outstretched glove of Jay Lenton into the Manuka Oval turf. He was lucky when Chris Green and Shane Watson dropped too short, gave him too much room or did both, and by the end of the PowerPlay the Renegades had plundered 59 runs. He was lucky when, with his score on 61, an apparent edge to Lenton did not result in a raised finger, and he was even luckier when he hit a pull shot straight down Sandhu’s throat – only for Sandhu to drop the easy catch. His luck finally ran out the next ball, with Green slipping past his nondescript swing, but the damage was done. Beneath his good fortune there lay an innings of exceptional quality, filled with a pair of well-struck sixes and some delightful strokes off the middle of the bat. He was in brilliant touch, and he made batting look easy against the Thunder’s feeble efforts.

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Big innings: Marcus Harris pulls during his key innings of 64.

At the other end, Matthew Short also reaped the benefits of the Thunder’s particularly loose opening. He hit Watson for a pair of boundaries, and was reprieved shortly afterwards when Ahmed made a shocking error. Short’s limp paddle around the corner was a very hard catch to drop, but Ahmed managed to put it down anyway. It wouldn’t have counted due to Mitchell McClenaghan’s no-ball, although it did not bode well for the Thunder’s chances. Ahmed eventually removed the opener himself, with Short caught mid-stride, beaten, and easily stumped by Lenton. Tom Cooper was run out after slipping in the middle of the pitch, and Dwayne Bravo never really got going before presenting McClenaghan with a return catch. The innings had fallen into a slump, and when Kieron Pollard and Jack Wildermuth departed in consecutive balls the Thunder seemed to have averted the worst of the damage. Then McClenaghan had a shocker. To describe his last over as very erratic would not be doing it justice, and Beau Webster capitalised by dispatching the innings’ last four balls for 18 runs to put the Renegades firmly in the box seat.

The Thunder shouldn’t have been close. They adopted a boom-or-bust approach in pursuing the massive target, and both James Vince and Kurtis Patterson fell to skied pull shots which were well caught by the Renegades’ nerveless boundary riders. Then Watson came in and clubbed a trio of sixes over mid-wicket, with Lenton adding a pair of well-hit sixes at the other end to provide some hope. It didn’t last. Watson fell to a stunning diving catch from Pollard and Lenton holed out to Webster, and the Thunder’s decision to swing for the fences looked to have set them on the path to a big loss. Then Arjun Nair and Ben Rohrer came together, and the Thunder’s approach started to work.

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Top catch: Kieron Pollard is completely focused as he removes Shane Watson with an excellent diving catch.

It was an unlikely pairing. Nair has bowled very well over the course of this season, but after receiving a 90-day suspension from delivering his mystery off-spinners it was unclear why he was still in the team. Now he was coming in at number five, and looked at least two spots too high in the batting order. At the start of this season, Rohrer was the grizzled veteran set to give the Thunder’s batting a bit of steel and some late-innings power. He had done neither. With their team’s season on the line, however, the pair found some form. Nair provided the spark, hitting very big sixes for fun despite his diminutive frame. It didn’t seem like much of a threat, not least because Nair didn’t look capable of keeping it up. Then Rohrer got in on the act, with one very big over. Wildermuth was the bowler, and his first two balls were wide and slapped to the vacant off-side boundary. The next four balls went to the fence as well, as Wildermuth showed neither the ability nor the foresight to bowl to his field and paid a heavy price. Rohrer took 28 from the over, and the Renegades were under pressure.

With his side in a bit of trouble, Kane Richardson stepped up. He had bowled two tight overs early, and he entered the attack looking to stop the flow of runs. It took him one over to remove Nair and Rohrer, with both joining their teammates in picking out men on the boundary, and he followed up with two more in his next over as Aiden Blizzard and Sandhu failed to make an impact. The Thunder weren’t completely done, and Green continued to fight with a series of lusty blows, but without Nair and Rohrer they couldn’t get the job done. It was sealed when McClenaghan was trapped in front by Pollard, and the fact that the big Kiwi was the only man who didn’t present the Renegades with a high catch spoke volumes about the Thunder’s unsuccessful approach on the night. They simply weren’t good enough.

Top 5
1. Kane Richardson (Melbourne Renegades)
Richardson came on for his second spell with the Renegades under pressure, and delivered in a big way with four crucial wickets. He made two massive breakthroughs in removing Nair and Rohrer, and put the Renegades on the brink of the finals with his accurate, miserly and match-winning efforts.
2. Marcus Harris (Melbourne Renegades)
Harris played a key role at the top of the order, making batting look very easy on a slightly two-paced wicket and putting the Thunder’s lacklustre bowling to the sword. His half-century was a welcome relief for him after he was initially dropped from the squad, and should be enough to seal his place for the remainder of the tournament.
3. Ben Rohrer (Sydney Thunder)
Rohrer started slowly as Nair looked to push the pace from the other end, but he got himself going by plundering 28 from one Wildermuth over. His clean striking gave the Renegades a very nasty scare with just a few overs to go, and he was unlucky to fall just two runs short of a half-century. He can draw some comfort from his best performance of the season.
4. Arjun Nair (Sydney Thunder)
Nair showed some previously hidden batting talents in compiling a surprisingly powerful 45 to put the Renegades under a bit of pressure. Some of his slog sweeps went an extraordinarily long way given his lack of size, and he showed that he can prove a handful even if he is unable to bowl.
5. Matthew Short (Melbourne Renegades)
Short’s contribution could be easily forgotten thanks to Harris’ fluency at the other end, but his efforts in compiling a classy 28 allowed the Renegades to compile the formidable opening partnership which ultimately proved the difference. He looked completely at ease against the Thunder’s bowling, and should be a good prospect for the Renegades.

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Thunder spinners rumble hapless Hurricanes

Hobart Hurricanes vs Sydney Thunder
Sydney Thunder 166-5 (Buttler 67, Watson 41, Rose 20-2) def Hobart Hurricanes 109 (Doolan 34, Archer 25*, Ahmed 14-2, Nair 17-2, McClenaghan 19-2, Sandhu 29-2, Green 30-2) by 57 runs at University of Tasmania Stadium

As Alex Doolan and D’Arcy Short walked out to open the Hobart Hurricanes’ pursuit of the 167 set by the Sydney Thunder, the hosts could be forgiven for feeling optimistic. Thanks to some effective late overs bowling they had limited the Thunder fairly well in Launceston’s first ever Big Bash game, and they had given themselves a good chance of getting their first win of the season. In the last over of the match, Tymal Mills edged a ball from Gurinder Sandhu onto his thigh pad and watched it rebound onto his stumps, concluding an innings, and a night, the Hurricanes would like to forget.

The chase started well enough. Doolan hit a nice four against Chris Green, and Short took an immediate liking to Sandhu when he came on for the second over, hitting two fours against shortish balls and hitting a full one beautifully for a nice six. It was as good as it got for the Hurricanes. Short was bowled the next over as he looked to take on Mitchell McClenaghan, getting a slight inside edge onto his stumps. Ben McDermott was next to go, advancing down the wicket against Sandhu, swiping across the line, and, unsurprisingly, hitting the ball straight up for Jos Buttler to take a nice catch. The Hurricanes were 2/44 after the PowerPlay, and their momentum had stalled.

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Brain fade: George Bailey plays an ill-fated lofted cover drive during the Hurricanes’ collapse.

Then George Bailey went out. Bailey had a good chance to lead from the front even though he looked in poor form. When Fawad Ahmed flighted a ball up, he had many options available, such as trying to hit through a gap along the ground or bunting it down the ground for a single. He chose to go inside out over cover, and was caught on the fence. Arjun Nair removed Matthew Wade the next over, with the out-of-form keeper surrendering meekly with a hard-handed push straight back to the bowler. Cameron Boyce, promoted as a pinch hitter, was nearly stumped first ball and miscued a slog sweep on his second, gifting Ahmed another wicket.

Doolan had witnessed the carnage from the other end, and then decided to join in by playing yet another ill-fated slog and picking out Green perfectly. Clive Rose entered the action and was lucky to survive when he was beaten by Ahmed, with Buttler somehow failing to complete a simple stumping thanks to an inability to take off the bails. Neither Ahmed nor Nair would add to their tallies of two wickets apiece, but their efforts as both hammer and anvil all but killed off the match. The Hurricanes only reached 100 through the efforts of Rose and Jofra Archer, the former showing better technique than most of the specialist batsmen and the latter hitting the ball with plenty of power despite a series of dodgy bats, but they were never going to get close. The end of Mills’ dismal occupation of the crease heralded the cessation of play, but the game had been over for some time.

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In control: Jos Buttler hits another one out of the middle on his way to 67.

The Thunder had built their total on the back of Buttler and Shane Watson, with Watson playing a mature supporting innings while Buttler blasted his way to fifty with some big hitting. Archer removed Kurtis Patterson early courtesy of Bailey’s one-handed diving catch, but Buttler was unfazed as he played himself in before exploding in the twelfth over. Tom Rogers was the unfortunate victim of Buttler’s brutal assault, with four big sixes testing the outer limits of the University of Tasmania Stadium as he moved from 36 to 62 in the space of six balls. He was out shortly afterwards, bowled by Rose as he looked to give himself room, and the innings never reached such lofty heights again. Watson’s innings ended with a senseless piece of running, with the Thunder captain dawdling up the pitch as an outfield throw came in at his end. It cost him a 50, and the Hurricanes closed the innings out well thanks to some great bowling from Archer, Mills and Rose.

None of it mattered, however, as the Hurricanes lodged one of the worst batting performances of the season to raise concerns as to whether they can beat anyone. The Thunder showed signs of improvement, but it remains to be seen whether they can repeat the feat against the sterner opposition they are sure to face further down the track.

Top 5
1. Jos Buttler (Sydney Thunder)
Buttler almost won the game off his own bat, playing himself in well before exploding with a remarkable burst of timing and power to give his side a timely boost. He hit Rogers for a series of massive sixes, and looked like he could easily score a century before he was dismissed. Kept well and took a nice high catch, but made a horrible gaffe to gift Rose a reprieve.
2. Fawad Ahmed (Sydney Thunder)
Ahmed took 2/14 from his four overs in a remarkably consistent spell which all but ended the Hurricanes’ resistance. Bowled perfectly in conjunction with Nair, and was very unlucky not to finish with three after a brilliant spell of bowling. Left the field late, and the Thunder will hope he is still available.
3. Arjun Nair (Sydney Thunder)
Nair bagged a pair of nice wickets to remove Doolan and Wade, and showed his class and variation by spinning the ball both ways and causing massive problems. He wasn’t hit for any boundaries in a four-over spell, and, at 19 years of age, looks to be an exciting prospect for Australian cricket.
4. Jofra Archer (Hobart Hurricanes)
Archer showed a bit of nonchalant class with both bat and ball, hitting it fairly well for an unbeaten 25 and providing some very economical bowling. He extracted sharp bounce from the Launceston pitch, and the only knock on his performance was the excess of nonchalance in the field which led to a dropped catch over the rope for six.
5. Clive Rose (Hobart Hurricanes)
Rose is not really known for his all-round talents, but he unearthed some hitherto undiscovered cricketing prowess to bag a pair of key wickets and play some neat shots in a determined innings of 13. He was the pick of the Hurricanes’ bowlers and showed excellent calmness under pressure to dismiss a rampaging Buttler.

Thunder wilt against dominant Strikers

Adelaide Strikers vs Sydney Thunder
Adelaide Strikers 163-6 (Carey 44, Head 36, Nair 36-3, McClenaghan 37-2) def Sydney Thunder 110 (Patterson 48, Laughlin 26-4, Siddle 6-2, Rashid 22-2) by 53 runs at Adelaide Oval

It was one of the best balls of the Big Bash’s early stages that kick-started the collapse. Rashid Khan had already removed Ryan Gibson with the first ball of his third over, catching the outside edge with an excellent leg-break and allowing Alex Carey to take a good catch. The Sydney Thunder were 3/69, and still had a chance of running down the Adelaide Strikers’ below par total of 163. Then Rashid stepped up again. His third ball was one of his googlies, and slid past Ben Rohrer’s helpless outside edge to clip the top of off stump. At 93 kph, it was too much for Rohrer, who didn’t pick it as the Afghan prodigy decisively swung momentum the way of the Strikers. The Thunder never recovered.

The Strikers had started well against the Thunder’s quick bowlers, with Carey and new captain Travis Head playing some excellent shots after Jake Weatherald was dismissed early. Carey was in particularly fluent form, driving with perfect timing and taking the lead as the Strikers finished the PowerPlay with a commanding 1/54. The boundaries kept flowing as the spinners came on, with Carey hitting Arjun Nair for a six over mid-wicket and lofting Ahmed over cover in the next over. When Head followed with another slog sweep for six off Nair, the Strikers looked set for a big total. It was not to be.

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Not happy: Mitchell McClenaghan’s emotions boiled over after colliding with Jonathan Wells and dropping a catch.

Neither man would hit another boundary, as Nair bagged Head three balls later. The Strikers captain was ready for a sweep shot, and was caught out by the short, wide off-break that followed, getting a bottom edge which was well taken by Jos Buttler. Carey was undone by the pressure a few overs later, attempting a reverse sweep off Nair and never looking in control of the shot. Colin Ingram never got going and departed the ball after hitting Nair over mid-wicket for his first boundary, and the new pair of Jonathan Wells and Jake Lehmann couldn’t find any momentum, or the fence. Mitchell McClenaghan’s bowling at the end was erratic and frustrated, with one particularly memorable ball landing wide of the cut strip and being called a no-ball for a waist high full toss. He also caused a long delay as Wells was investigated for obstructing the field, and looked flustered and off his game. The Strikers could not capitalise, and their total of 6/163 looked well below par on a good pitch.

It looked even worse when Jos Buttler hit the first two balls of the innings to the boundary, although the Strikers had steadied somewhat when Peter Siddle entered the attack in the third over. Siddle used the nagging accuracy which made him such an effective Test bowler to great effect, tying down Kurtis Patterson and collecting the big wicket of Buttler as Billy Stanlake took a catch backpedalling at fine-leg. Some effective bowling limited the Thunder to 1/35 by the end of the PowerPlay, even with Ben Laughlin giving away some free boundaries when introduced into the attack. Rashid entered directly afterwards, and saw two of his first three balls cut to the boundary. He didn’t concede another.

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Breakthrough: Peter Siddle takes a nice catch to remove Kurtis Patterson for 48.

The big wicket fell when Shane Watson, the hero of the Thunder’s first up win, holed out, attempting to hit Head out of the attack. The theory of taking on the part-timer was sound, but in practice it backfired as the Strikers captain dismissed his opposite number with his first ball. Patterson managed to hit some nice shots against Head and moved into the forties while playing with more fluency than he had done in the season opener. Then Rashid took his two wickets in three balls, and the collapse had begun. Patterson was still at large, but when he fell brashly advancing down the wicket against Stanlake the Thunder’s bandwagon, which had been starting to slip, fell off a cliff. Aiden Blizzard used his fluoro green bat to hit his second ball in the air. Chris Green, with a similarly coloured blade, couldn’t even hit the one ball he faced, Ben Laughlin picking up a second wicket in three balls as Green was out leg before. McClenaghan got a wide one first up, and somehow bunted it into the air for Head to take his second catch of the over. The hat-trick ball was negotiated by Nair, who had observed the carnage from the other end, but the game was over.

Neither Fawad Ahmed nor Andrew Fekete could do more than look shaky and eventually get out as the game meandered to its inevitable conclusion. Nair continued to fight, hitting a nice six and displaying excellent temperament and technique against the excellent and diverse bowling attack, but the Thunder were way too far gone for his battling 23 not out to matter. The Strikers exposed the fragility of the Thunder’s batting line-up with ruthless efficiency, picking up a big first-up win and looking like a force to be reckoned with.

Top 5
1. Rashid Khan (Adelaide Strikers)
The 19-year-old from Afghanistan did not disappoint on his BBL debut, getting better the longer he bowled and turning the game on its head with the wickets of Gibson and Rohrer in the space of three balls. He was turning the ball both ways by the end of the innings, and suggested that he still has some room for improvement.
2. Peter Siddle (Adelaide Strikers)
Siddle’s bowling was almost perfect, bowling no bad balls in three overs and removing Buttler before he could do too much damage. He has managed to turn his remarkable accuracy into a major strength, and appears to have improved his T20 bowling.
3. Arjun Nair (Sydney Thunder)
Nair looked more composed than his more experienced teammates with bat in hand, and took three big wickets as the Strikers looked to push on with their fast start. He showed excellent skills and turned the ball both ways, and looks to be an exciting young prospect.
4. Ben Laughlin (Adelaide Strikers)
Laughlin was poor early, but a big second over ensured the Thunder could not get back in the game. He finished with four wickets as the batsmen looked to take him on, often falling in the attempt. His slower balls were as effective as ever, but there was definitely room for improvement.
5. Alex Carey (Adelaide Strikers)
Carey showed why he was a contender to take the gloves for Australia with a top-class wicketkeeping display to back up a great innings. He fell just 6 short of a half-century, but found the middle of the bat well and played a lofted cover drive off Ahmed which was particularly impressive. He took a pair of nice catches and was almost flawless behind the stumps.

Vintage Watson guides Thunder home

Sydney Thunder vs Sydney Sixers
Sydney Sixers 149-9 (Billings 32, Maddinson 31, Hughes 29, Ahmed 11-2, McClenaghan 25-2, Nair 29-2) lost to Sydney Thunder 150-5 (Watson 77, Patterson 29, Sams 14-4) by 5 wickets at Spotless Stadium

The latest edition of the Big Bash League was greatly anticipated, and the season opening ‘Sydney Smash’ proved to be a thrilling contest with plenty of drama and a last ball win for the Thunder. In the midst of it all, Shane Watson played an innings reminiscent of his dominant best, treating anything short with contempt and providing his side with a calming presence to drag them past the target.

The Sixers were sent in to bat and started well, recovering from Mitchell McClenaghan’s early removal of Jason Roy to find the boundary with ease. Daniel Hughes looked composed if not spectacular, putting away any bad balls, and Nic Maddinson batted with a fluency he had not shown since his call-up to the Test team last summer. Maddinson’s lofted six over long-off was the main highlight as the Sixers scored 55 from the PowerPlay, setting a perfect base for a big score.

Enter Fawad Ahmed. He came into the attack in the seventh over with the Sixers cruising, and immediately began to turn the ball on a slow Spotless Stadium pitch. He used his variation to remove Maddinson for 31, and proceeded to tie down the Sixers by tossing the ball up and letting it turn. When Arjun Nair came on at the other end the consequences were devastating. Moises Henriques never got going, and after hitting a big six off Nair’s first ball he was dismissed when he tried again. Hughes had batted well, but he didn’t learn his lesson after an ill-advised slog nearly saw him stumped, instead choosing to go again and finding himself caught in the deep. Johan Botha came in and was beaten by the turn, Nair’s big-spinning off-break catching him with his bat nowhere near the ball. The Sixers were 5/80, and in big trouble.

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Jump for joy: Arjun Nair celebrates the wicket of Johan Botha, which left the Sixers 5/79

At this point Sam Billings stepped up. He had entered after Henriques threw his wicket away, and witnessed Hughes’ lack of awareness and Botha’s lack of technique from the other end, all while playing Ahmed and Nair’s excellent bowling with an unconcerned air befitting one of England’s best players of spin. It was a pair of stunning reverse sweeps which showed his class, crushing Nair to the fence with contemptuous ease as Peter Nevill struggled to find form at the other end. Nevill departed shortly afterwards, and Billings was run out for 32 after some excellent death bowling from McClenaghan and Andrew Fekete. At this point, Steve O’Keefe was leading the charge, hitting three boundaries through mid-wicket in a manner which suggested he had few other shots. McClenaghan proved this theory by bowling outside off stump, and four consecutive dots in the last over saw the Sixers limp to 149.

As fragile as the Sixers batting had looked, there remained a sense that the Thunder’s could be more so if they couldn’t get going. Their pursuit of 150 couldn’t have gotten off to a worse start, Jos Buttler succumbing to some excellent bowling from the previously unheard of Daniel Sams and bringing Watson to the wicket at 1/1. Where the Sixers began fluently and aggressively, the Thunder were just slow. Kurtis Patterson found the middle of the bat but could not pick out a gap, and his only boundaries came from inside edges off Sams’ impressive left-arm pace. Watson looked to have some degree of control, with a particularly solid hit over mid-wicket hinting at a proficiency against the short ball the Sixers would have done well to heed.

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Top form: Shane Watson bats during his match-winning 77.

Even still, 1/37 was an inadequate haul, and even though Watson was able to hit the occasional boundary against the spin of Botha and O’Keefe the required run rate was soon beginning to rise and the pressure was starting to build. It was Sams who ended the partnership, claiming another wicket with a brilliant slower ball which decked back to bowl Patterson. When Ben Rohrer chipped a simple catch to Henriques off Botha and Ryan Gibson began to show a remarkable lack of form, the Thunder were in big trouble. Watson brought up his 50 in the 15th over with a big straight six, and followed up with another off Botha the next over, but Gibson was playing so badly that Watson was only facing two balls an over and retirement appeared a viable option.

It was at this point that Sean Abbott returned to the attack. Coming off a season in which he led the BBL in wickets, Abbott had bowled two overs with confidence before he decided to drop short to Watson. When, not unexpectedly, the in-form Thunder captain smashed it over mid-wicket, Abbott’s morale dropped like a lead balloon. The resilience he had possessed in spades last season was long gone, with a full toss followed by a massive wide and a short ball which was slashed over point. Watson had found his touch, and Abbott had completely lost his, as 16 came from the over and the Thunder were left needing 26 off 3 overs.

Soon Watson was gone, along with the horrendously out of sorts Gibson, when Sams returned. Both were caught as the young left-armer turned the match again, and the penultimate over, delivered by Bollinger, was similarly effective. With Nair and Aiden Blizzard at the crease, the latter with a fluorescent green bat in hand, the Thunder needed 15 off the last over. Abbott was bowling, and his self-confidence drained further as Nair hit two fours off bad balls to leave Blizzard with 6 to get off three. It was defendable, but a Thunder victory was the inevitable result as Abbott miscued again. With 1 needed off the last ball, Nair scrambled through for the winning runs to end a thrilling, topsy-turvy match which only heightens excitement levels for the season ahead.

Top 5
1. Shane Watson (Sydney Thunder)
The star of the show, Watson showed incredible composure to carry the Thunder’s innings with out-of-form teammates at the other end. He punished anything short or overpitched, and played a captain’s knock which reminded all watching of his destructive best.
2. Daniel Sams (Sydney Sixers)
Sams was incredible on debut, taking 4-14 and looking the Sixers most dangerous bowler by a long way. He took four of the five wickets, including the massive scalp of Watson, and he appears to be an excellent long-term prospect with his smarts and ability to change it up.
3. Fawad Ahmed (Sydney Thunder)
Ahmed used his variations and flight to devastating effect, beginning with a wicket maiden and going on to deliver a spell which dismantled the Sixers early momentum. He bowled with confidence and excellent control, and his ability to put the brakes on the Sixers middle order bodes well for the tournament ahead.
4. Arjun Nair (Sydney Thunder)
Things weren’t looking great for Nair when his first ball, a full toss, was dispatched to the boundary, but he responded by taking the massive wicket of Henriques and very nearly removing Hughes two balls later. He was tight and ensured that there was no let off when Ahmed was not bowling, and he made a handy contribution with the bat to seal the win.
5. Sam Billings (Sydney Sixers)
Played a mature innings amidst the Sixers spin-induced collapse, looking completely at ease and accelerating well to give his side a chance. His pair of reverse sweeps against Nair were beautiful shots, and he showcased his power with a nice six over mid-wicket when it was time to attack.