Portugal, and Ronaldo, bow out against Cavani’s brilliant double

Ricardo Quaresma attempted to dance around Christian Stuani on the right wing. Portugal were desperately chasing a late equaliser against a determined Uruguayan defence, and their World Cup future was on the line. Eventually, Quaresma decided he couldn’t really get past Stuani. Instead, he jumped over him, intent on gaming the referee and winning a free-kick in a dangerous position. César Ramos was not fooled, the ball went out for a goal-kick, and Portugal reacted indignantly. Cristiano Ronaldo, their captain, undisputed star player and main goal scorer, led the protests. He ran towards Ramos, got in his face, and received a yellow card for his troubles. Even if Portugal had managed to equalise in the final moments, and even if they had made it through to the quarter-finals, Ronaldo would have been suspended. It wasn’t really fitting that what was potentially Ronaldo’s final act at a World Cup involved a disciplinary indiscretion.

The game was always likely to be an interesting one, with both sides fielding solid defences and dangerous attacks headlined by world-class talent (Luis Suárez and Edinson Cavani for Uruguay, Ronaldo for Portugal). It was Suárez and Cavani who struck first. Cavani started it, receiving the ball on the right wing and switching it across Portugal’s back four to pick out Suárez on the left. Having received the truly remarkable pass, Suárez cut back onto his right foot, as if preparing to shoot. His cross almost looked like a shot as it flew towards the back post. Then Cavani got on the end of it. If Portugal thought Cavani had played his part after his brilliant cross-field ball, they were wrong. The Uruguayan striker put in an immense effort to complete a brilliant cross-field one-two which broke down Portugal’s defence. The finish, a header from close range, was the easy part.

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César Ramos (right) shows Cristiano Ronaldo a yellow card for dissent. Ronaldo lost his cool in the final moments of Portugal’s defeat, culminating in his second booking of the tournament.

Now chasing the game, Portugal controlled possession and territory but never really looked capable of breaching Uruguay’s solid and very determined defence. Ronaldo had a shot blocked. Gonçalo Guedes had a shot blocked. William Carvalho tried a long shot. It was blocked. Crosses were played into the box, looking for Ronaldo, but they were never quite on point and they were mostly claimed without challenge by Uruguayan goalkeeper Fernando Muslera. Occasionally, they weren’t too far off, and Diego Godín would have to head them away instead. When Uruguay went forward quickly after Portugal’s missed chances, Suárez won a free-kick and forced Rui Patrício into a tough save as he directed said free-kick under the wall. It was more dangerous than any of Portugal’s many attacks. Back up the other end, Ronaldo took a free-kick on the edge of the box. It was blocked, by the wall, and cleared away by Lucas Torreira’s bicycle kick. A succession of poor crosses and ineffective attacks later, Portugal went to half time without looking like breaking down Uruguay’s seemingly impenetrable defence.

Portugal started the second half much as they finished the first, dominating possession but failing to make much of it. Then, shortly after resumption, they scored. It all happened quite suddenly, starting with some nice build-up play and a corner emanating from Adrien Silva’s shot on the edge of the area. Silva slipped, but his shot was somehow deflected away for a corner. From the corner, they found the back of the net. It was a rare defensive lapse from Uruguay which created the opening. Raphaël Guerreiro’s cross beat Godín’s partner, José María Giménez, and Ronaldo’s big leap. Unfortunately for Uruguay, Pepe was there, and completely unmarked. He had no problems getting his head to the ball, and he had even fewer issues putting the header into the back of the net.

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Edinson Cavani celebrates after scoring one of his two goals. Both of Cavani’s goals were brilliant finishes, and they delivered Uruguay to victory.

It didn’t take long for Uruguay to take the lead again. Cavani scored the goal, beating Patrício with a classy finish and sending the Uruguayan fans into raptures. It began with a mistake. Pepe, the goal scoring hero only a few minutes earlier, bungled a defensive header, presenting Nahitan Nández with the opportunity to run at Portugal’s now stretched defence. He played a beautiful sideways pass to Cavani, who received the ball just inside the box and in plenty of space. Cavani had a few options as he approached Nández’s perfect pass. He could pick up the ball and dribble towards goal, getting himself to close range before unleashing a shot. He could have dribbled wide and put in a cross for Suárez, who was streaming through the middle. Instead, he shot first-time. He angled his run towards the ball so that he could shoot with the instep of his right foot, and he nonchalantly curled the ball past Patrício and into the opposite corner of the net. It was a truly remarkable strike, and it left Portugal needing another equaliser.

Portugal began to improve as they pursued their second goal, but they couldn’t find the elusive equaliser. Muslera made a mess of dealing with Guerreiro’s cross, but Bernardo Silva couldn’t capitalise as he blasted it over the top of an empty goal. Mexican referee Ramos decided he had fouled Muslera anyway. Their crosses became more dangerous, and they were creating shots in better positions. Uruguay didn’t seem to care. Godín won the ball in the air every time it was kicked in his direction, and Uruguay’s hard work meant that they continued to weather the storm. They threw themselves in front of shots. They were always there to challenge the Portuguese. Ronaldo attempted to intimidate his opponents with tricks and breeze straight past them. Unfazed, they just waited until his tricks had been completed and kicked the ball away contemptuously. Uruguay had an answer to everything Portugal threw at them. By the end, Portugal had nothing left to throw.

Sochi – Fisht Olympic Stadium
Uruguay 1 (Cavani 7, 62)
Portugal 1 (Pepe 55)
Referee: César Ramos (Mex)
Uruguay (4-4-2): Muslera – Cáceres, Giménez, Godín, Laxalt; Nández (Sánchez 81), Vecino, Torreira, Bentancur (Rodríguez 63); Suárez, Cavani (Stuani 74).
Portugal (4-4-2): Rui Patrício – Ricardo Pereira, Pepe, Fonte, Guerreiro; Bernardo Silva, William Carvalho, Adrien Silva (Quaresma 65), João Mário (Manuel Fernandes 85); Guedes (André Silva 74), Ronaldo.

Top 5
1. Edinson Cavani (Uruguay)
Cavani was in brilliant form, scoring both of Uruguay’s goals and providing a touch of class to every Uruguayan move. His finish to complete the second goal was superlative, and his hard work and effortless class allowed him to score the game’s opener. His combination with Suárez looks scary, and Uruguay will be hoping that the late niggle he picked up doesn’t hurt their campaign.
2. Diego Godín (Uruguay)
Where would Uruguay be without Diego Godín? It’s certain that they’d be nowhere near as solid. Once again, Uruguay’s captain and defensive leader was colossal, rebuffing Portugal’s attacks thanks to his height, experience and brilliant positioning. He always seemed to be exactly where Uruguay needed him, and he ensured Uruguay’s safe passage to the quarter-finals.
3. William Carvalho (Portugal)
William was in fine form, pulling the strings from deep in midfield and taking charge of all of Portugal’s attacking play. His defensive work rate was good, but it was his underrated playmaking ability which really stood out on a night where little went right for the Portuguese.
4. Lucas Torreira (Uruguay)
Torreira’s defensive effort was unbelievable, as he pushed himself to his limits with his determination to get in front of shots and keep Portugal from breaking through. He threw himself in Portugal’s way, at one point ending up on the ground after blocking a particularly powerful effort from Ronaldo. He fought very hard.
5. Bernardo Silva (Portugal)
Silva hadn’t really found form in the group stage, and he found himself dropped for Portugal’s crucial clash with Iran as a result. Restored to the starting line-up, he finally justified his selection, looking dangerous as he ran at Uruguayan defenders and putting in some incisive crosses.

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