Germany breathe a sigh of relief as Kroos classic leaves Sweden heartbroken

Toni Kroos stood over the free-kick. Germany’s crunch clash with Sweden was coming to an end, with the teams level and the Germans desperately searching for a winner. After nearly 95 minutes of action, the Germans were fighting to keep their World Cup destiny in their own hands, and the pressure of a nation’s high expectations sat on Kroos’ shoulders. The Germans didn’t expect to be in for a group stage fight when they came to Russia. Then their defence was decimated by Mexico’s lethal counter-attacks, and they sunk to a 1-0 loss. Now, with the score at 1-1 against the Swedes, and with just 10 men on the field, Germany were relying on Kroos. The recriminations if he couldn’t create something would be massive.

Kroos was on a tight angle which made shooting difficult. He shot anyway. He rolled the ball to Marco Reus, who trapped it and left it alone. In the Swedish wall, Jimmy Durmaz and Sebastian Larsson, free to run at the ball, attempted to charge Kroos down. They didn’t worry him. Having ever-so-slightly improved the angle, he stepped back up to the ball and took his shot. Robin Olsen didn’t stand a chance as the ball curved and, as if floating, bypassed his desperate dive. It was, thanks to its importance, timing and, above all, difficulty, a goal that will stick in the memory long after this tournament is done. Germany won, and Kroos’ classic strike may well have saved their tournament.

Germany got off to a fast start, shooting out of the blocks as if possessed and placing their opponents under immense pressure. The chances came thick and fast. Sweden clumsily dealt with Joshua Kimmich’s cross and required a desperate goal line block from Larsson to repel Julian Draxler’s shot from a dangerous position. Soon after, the ball was set up for Jonas Hector to volley, but Andreas Granqvist did well to interpose his body between ball and goal. The chances kept coming. Draxler slipped a half-cross-half-shot just past the post. Victor Lindelöf just managed to bundle the ball out when Reus slipped past Ludwig Augustinsson and centred the ball for Timo Werner. Less than 10 minutes had elapsed.

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Toni Kroos celebrates after scoring Germany’s late winner. A German win wasn’t looking likely until Kroos found the back of the net with a well-hit shot into the top corner.

Signs of their vulnerabilities against Mexico did remain, and Sweden managed to exploit them once or twice. Just under 15 minutes had gone when Antonio Rüdiger made a mistake in possession and Marcus Berg surged towards the German goal. He was only denied by a questionable challenge from Jérôme Boateng and a typically excellent save from an onrushing Manuel Neuer. Sweden continued to protest Boateng’s non-punishment for a good five minutes, but no change in decision was forthcoming. After Germany’s early surge pushed Sweden to the brink, the heat had gone out of the game, and the Swedish defence was looking much more assured. Then Sweden scored.

As was the case against Mexico, Germany conceded from a turnover. The normally solid Kroos made an uncharacteristic mistake in possession, allowing Sweden to flood forward in transition. The ball found Viktor Claesson, whose lofted pass towards the centre found Ola Toivonen. Toivonen held off Antonio Rüdiger as he controlled the ball, and with the big centre-back lunging desperately to stop him the Swedish striker lifted the ball over Neuer towards the back of the net. Time seemed to stand still as Toivonen’s shot, aided by a slight deflection from Rüdiger, looped towards the goal line. As it finally buried itself in the back of the net, it cued delirium for Sweden and devastation for Germany. Suddenly, Germany were on the brink of the unthinkable: a group stage exit.

Olsen denied the Germans shortly afterwards with two brilliant stops in rapid succession. İlkay Gündoğan started it, forcing the Swedish keeper into a diving parry, and when he only managed a slight – and slightly inadvertent – deflection on Thomas Müller’s follow-up effort it looked as if the Germans had scored. Mercifully for Sweden, and agonisingly for Germany, the ball rolled just wide of the goalpost while a now helpless Olsen watched on. Sweden continued to make occasional forays forward, with Claesson denied by a last-ditch challenge from Hector and Berg forcing Neuer to pull out a stunning save with a brilliant header, but they couldn’t add to their lead. They didn’t really have to. When the half time whistle blew, Toivonen’s goal was still the difference between the sides.

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Jérôme Boateng is shown the red card by referee Szymon Marciniak. The decision left Germany with only 10 men, but it didn’t stop them from winning the match.

Germany needed to respond after half time, and they did. Finally, after a catastrophic defeat against Mexico and a potentially scandalous first half against Sweden, the Germans found the back of the net. Finally, they responded with their backs against the wall. It came from Werner, who slipped through on the left and pulled the ball back looking for one of his attackers. He had options. It went past Müller, rolling on through and taking a slight deflection off Lindelöf. It went behind Mario Gómez, taking a slight deflection off the half time substitute on the way. It went to Reus, and he didn’t miss. He bundled the ball past Olsen, and Germany breathed a slight sigh of relief. It wasn’t pretty, and it came straight off his knee, but Germany didn’t care.

There was still the small matter of winning the game, and the second half passed without too much goalmouth action. The Germans were on top in terms of possession and territory, but time seemed to fly as they pressed the Swedish defence without creating too many chances. Sweden still had some opportunities, and Neuer only just recovered from losing his balance in time to stop John Guidetti from getting on the end of a very dangerous ball. Then Boateng, already booked for a poor challenge on Emil Forsberg, took out Berg’s legs. Szymon Marciniak had no choice but to send him off, and Germany’s task got a lot harder. They kept pushing, but it looked like they were going to be denied.

They started to find better chances as the game entered its final moments. Kroos put in a beautiful cross, and Gómez met it with a perfectly-timed header. It seemed destined for the back of the net before Olsen reacted. He leapt to tap it over the bar, keeping the Germans at bay. Julian Brandt came off the bench and had a chance when he found space to shoot outside the box. His shot was driven with tremendous force. It had Olsen completely beaten. It also rammed into the bottom of the post, leaving the Swedish goal threatened but unharmed. Then, with seconds left, Kroos scored. It didn’t erase the stress of the first two games. It didn’t completely undo the harm that Germany have done their World Cup chances. But it put their fate back in their hands, and that’s all that matters.

Sochi – Fisht Olympic Stadium
Germany 1 (Reus 48, Kroos 90+5)
Sweden 1 (Toivonen 32)
Referee: Szymon Marciniak (Pol)
Germany (4-2-3-1): Neuer – Kimmich, Boateng, Rüdiger, Hector (Brandt 87); Rudy (Gündoğan 31), Kroos; Müller, Draxler (Gómez 46), Reus; Werner.
Sent-off: Boateng 82
Sweden (4-4-2): Olsen – Lustig, Lindelöf, Granqvist, Augustinsson; Claesson (Durmaz 74), Larsson, Ekdal, Forsberg; Berg (Kiese Thelin 90), Toivonen (Guidetti 78).

Top 5
1. Marco Reus (Germany)
Reus scored the crucial equalising goal, and created plenty of chances with his movement in attacking midfield. His ability to make things happen in and around the penalty area more than justified his selection over Mesut Özil, and he seems to be in excellent form.
2. Andreas Granqvist (Sweden)
Granqvist led the Swedish defence, and he was in top form as they held firm until the last minute. He was always determined to stop his opponents, and he pulled off some excellent pieces of defensive play throughout. He has been in excellent form, and he will be the key to Sweden’s chances as they aim to beat the odds and make the second round.
3. Toni Kroos (Germany)
Kroos was largely responsible for Sweden’s goal, but he built into the match as it went on and he played a crucial role in the win with his brilliant late goal. He was usually solid in possession, and his class began to assert itself as the game came to a close. His winner was incredible.
4. Timo Werner (Germany)
A half time switch to the left-wing paid dividends for Werner, who began to attack the Swedish defence from wide areas and put dangerous balls into the box. He assisted Reus for the equaliser, and his combination with Hector provided Germany’s most potent second half threat.
5. Robin Olsen (Sweden)
Olsen made some brilliant saves to deny the Germans, and his work improved as the game went on. His double save to deny Gündoğan and Müller and his reflex stop to deny Gómez’s brilliant header kept the Swedish in the game.

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